FAQ

What is Call To Action?

Call To Action is a movement of Catholics who are inspired by their faith to transform the church.

How can I get involved?

Every Catholic counts as we build an inclusive church. You can sign up to receive our action alerts, join the conversation on Facebook or Twitter, become a member, connect with your a local chapter, attend conference, or volunteer at our national office.

How many members does Call To Action have?

Call To Action has 25,000 supporters including laity, women religious, deacons, priests and bishops.

Where does the name “Call To Action” come from?

In October 1976, the U.S. Bishops held the first Call To Action conference in Cobo Hall, Detroit. At this historic event, 1,351 lay, religious and clergy delegates, appointed by their local bishops, voted for an inclusive church, open to women and married priests, with shared decision-making and greater social justice. That Call To Action was the culmination of a two-year national consultation involving over 800,000 Catholics in 125 dioceses. Cardinal John Dearden, the conference chairman, hailed this collaboration as a “new way of doing the work of the church in America.”

What do Catholics think about Call To Action?

They love us! Call To Action’s mission represents the views of the majority of Catholics. We vocalize what mainstream Catholics already believe:

  • 70% of U.S. Catholics believe that women should be ordained as priests (March 2013 New York Times/CBS Poll)
  • 78% see a greater need for shared authority with the laity (November 2002 Contemporary Catholic Trends Survey)
  • 62% of U.S. Catholics believe that the Church should become more democratic in its decision-making (April 2005 Contemporary Catholic Trends Survey)
  • 81% support a greater openness in financial and administrative matters in the American Catholic Church (November 2002 Contemporary Catholic Trends Survey)
  • 74% of Catholics believe that gay and lesbian relationships should be accepted by society (March 2011 Public Religion Research Institute)
  • 83% of U.S. Catholics believe that it is morally wrong to discriminate against homosexuals (November 2001 Contemporary Catholic Trends Survey)